Thursday, January 18, 2018



It's not set in Europe but this Japanese castle looks to fit the early modern period.

Here's a series of posts illustrating the creation process.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Early Modern Price List

Some time ago I switched from running Honor+Intrigue to Star Wars D6 so I haven't posted anything for H+I in quite awhile. But on a forum I sometimes frequent the question of price lists came up so I thought I would share the price list that I used for 1620s France. Sources include Flashing Blades, Pirates and Zombies, Savage Worlds, All for One: Regime Diabolique, historical Medieval Prices, and other sources.



Common Coinage
1 sous (s)   =   12        deniers (d)
1 Livre (L)   =   20        sous
1 Escudo     =     5        livres
1 Ducat       =     7        livres
1 Pistole     =   10        livres (also 1 Doubloon or double escudo)
1 Pound      =   20        livres
Black Powder Weapons
Price
Includes basic tools, bullet mold, etc         Matchlock/Snaphaunce/Wheellock
Pocket Pistol             1d6+1 Dmg;            5’ Range
        /  20 / 25 L
Belt Pistol                 1d6+1 Dmg;          10’ Range
    13 /  20 / 25 L
Naval Pistol              1d6+1 Dmg;          10’ Range
        /  42 / 52 L
Horse Pistol              1d6+1 Dmg;          15’ Range
        /  45 / 56 L
Holsters for pistols
10 sous
Double Barreled Pistol 2x Cost for pistol type
2x Cost
Volley pistol (Duckfoot Pistol) 1d6 damage/target
        /  40 / 50 L
Blunderbuss Pistol                 5’/15’ = 2d6/1d6 Dmg
        /  44 / 55 L
Carbine                        2d6 Dmg;          30’ Range
        /  22 / 30 L
Shoulder belt for carbine
1 L
Arquebus                      2d6 Dmg;          50’ Range
    20 /  30 / 40 L
Musket                        2d6 Dmg;          50’ Range
    18 /  24 / 36 L
Fork Rest (required for Musket) +10’ to Range
3 L
Musketoon                   2d6 Dmg;          30’ Range
    15 /  22 / 30 L
Blunderbuss            10’/20’/30’ = 3d6/2d6/1d6 Dmg
        /  22 / 30 L
Rifled weapon; cost +X%; point blank= no effect
+20’ range up to 2x base range
Grenade Launcher
        / 60 /   - L
Grenade
                   9 L
Black Powder General Equipment
Price
Sufficient powder, lead, wadding, and igniters for 100 shots. The bullets must be cast by the user. Powder is loose; cartridges must be made if desired.
30 sous or  1½ L
Small powder flask (For priming powder or loading a pistol 12 pistol loads, 28 primings)
10 sou
Medium powder flask
(36 pistol loads, 12 musket/rifle/blunderbuss loads)
12 sou
Large powder flask or horn
(100 pistol loads, 36 musket/rifle/blunderbuss loads)
15 sou
Patch box, built in (Small metal box that is set into rifle stock. Holds 20 patches)
13 sou
Patch box (50 patch capacity)
6 sou
Cartridge box (20 pre-made cartridges w bullets)
10 sou
Bandoleer, the 12 apostles,
(12 charging flasks that hold pre measured powder loads. Can be used for sword as well)
2 L
Bullet Pouch
(For carrying loose bullets, wadding, tools etc)
3 sou
Bullet mold (Generally comes with the weapon)
8 sou
Lead for bullets (10 to 20 bullets per pound)
3 sou/pound
Lead melting kit (Tongs, ladle, pot)
13 sou
Gun Flints (12 to 15 shots per flint; used for snaplocks, doglocks, and flintlocks)
1 sou @
Pyrites (8 to 12 shots per pyrite used for wheellocks)
1 sou @
Whisk & Pick(For cleaning fouling from touch hole; included in original purchase)
2 sou
Spanner (Winds a Wheellock; part of original purchase. Replacement must be made)
2 L
Musket Tool kit (Needed for disassembling a firearm, screw driver, wrench etc. part of original purchase)
15 sou
Spring vise (Needed to keep a lock's springs from being unseated and lost)
48 sous
Slow match: burns 4 inches/hr; weighs 1lb/5 yds; 1 pound of match costs 15 sous & burns for 45 hrs.
15 sou
Firearm or gun pouch (water-resistant)
30 sous or  1½ L
Cartridge pouch: 50 balls and cleaning kit
7 sous
Cleaning kit
13 sous
Armor
Price
Milanese Full Armor (Protection: 1d6+1 + Bonus Die)
200 L
Cuirassier ¾ armor (Protection: 1d6+1)
90 L
Cuirass of pistol proof with pauldrons
26 L
Burgonet or lobster-tailed pot helmet
20 L
Gorget
3 L
Rerebraces, couters, and vambraces c
10 L
Metal Gauntlets
8 L
Long tassets (waist, thigh, & knee guards)
18 L
Plain Riding Boots
5 L
Armor
Price
Buckler
10 L
Target
10 L
Buffcoat (Protection: 1d3)
16 L
Dragoon’s Armor: Cuirass without pauldrons, buff coat, morion helmet, bridal gauntlet (Protection: 1d6)
40 L
Pikeman’s armor (Protection: 1d6)
48 L
Cuirass without pauldrons
20 L
Morion helmet
10 L
Infantry Tassets (waist & thigh guards)
16 L
Heavy Gloves
2 L
Pauldrons
6 L
Padded Doublet, sleeves, breeches  (Protection: 1)
10 L
Swords
Price
Rapier
12 L
Broadsword or Longsword
12 L
Saber or Backsword
10 L
Cutlass or Hanger
5 L
Small Sword
9 L
2-Handed Sword
15 L
Sword Belt
2 L
Sheath
1 L
Other Weapons
Price
Main Gauche (left-hand dagger)
9 L
Sword Breaker
18 L
Dagger
3 L
Stiletto
5 L
Throwing Dagger: 1d3+1 Damage
5 L
Knife: 1d3 Damage
30 sous
Baton
5 L
Hand axe or tomahawk
6 L
Pike, or Halberd
12 L
Large Axe
9 L
Pike
12 L
Poleaxe
10 L
Cavalry Lance
16 L
Whip
5 L
Crossbow
32 L
Bow
26 L
Quiver (holds 16 bolts or 24 arrows)
2 L
16 Quarrels or 24 Arrows
1 L
Spare Bowstring
1 L
Balestrin (hand crossbow); 1d3 Damage; 5’ Range
24 L
Transportation
Price
Ox
40 L
Donkey                                 +2 L/month upkeep
30 L
Mule                                     +3 L/month upkeep
50 L
Pony                                     +3 L/month upkeep
60 L
Cob                                      +4 L/month upkeep
100 L
Draft Horse                            +4 L/month upkeep
60 L
Riding Horse                          +6 L/month upkeep
300 L
War Horse                             +8 L/month upkeep
200 L
Horse Quality: Poor -50%, Fair (–), Good +100%, Excellent +200%, Superb +400%

Average Riding Saddle & Tack
15 L
Average Cavalry Saddle & Tack
25 L
Fine Saddle and Tack
x2 to x5
Whip
5 L
Sedan Chair (includes 2-4 burly porters) per day
6-10 L
Cart (requires 1 draft horse, ox, ponies, or mules)
20-100 L
Wagon (requires 2 draft horse team)
240 L
Carriage (requires 4 draft horse team)
480 L
Fancy Carriage (requires 4+ horse team)
720 L
Hired Carriage (city or large town only) per day
10 L
Ferry Crossing: (row boat or barge)
1d–1 L
River Barge: (if space is available) per day
5 sous
Farmer’s Cart: hitching a ride; the journey will often take longer than if they had walked
1d
Carriage Ride (across France)
10-20 L
Carriage Ride (across Europe)
30-50 L
English Channel fare
7 L
English Channel fare with stern cabin
15 L
Boat Passage (Mediterranean or North Sea)
25-40 L
Boat Passage (to New World)
50-60 L
Support and Upkeep
Price
Monthly Expenses (food, shelter, etc.)
3 L x Social Rank
Monthly Upkeep:
Draft Horse / Riding Horse / Cavalry Horse
L
4 / 6 / 8 L
Lodging
Price
Coaching Inn: evening meal, room for the night, and breakfast, must vacate room during the day
4-6 L
Roadside Inn (per night)
                                              Stabling a horse
1-3 L
+1 L
Fodder to feed a mount for one day
2 deniers
Lodging-house: provides a room for the night but no food (cities or large towns only)
Flea-ridden slum-dwellings
Clean and respectable premises


1-2 sous
5 L
Taverns: Cater to a better class of patron, good rooms (with room service) and good food; per night
5-7 L
Housing
Price
Apartment, Cheap: 2-3-bedroom rented town apartment; rundown and in a slum area; per year
40-60 L/year
House: A tiny one-bedroom rented house; per year
80-100 L/year
Cottage: A tumbledown rented cottage; per year
10 L/year
Townhouse and Garden                     20L/month
2,500 L
Suburban Villa                                  40L/month
4,500 L
Small Country Estate                         80L/month
12,000 L
Large Country Estate                         90L/month
20,000 L
Château                                        120L/month
35,000 L
Restaurants and Meals Out
Price
Eating House: frequented by upper class gentlemen; serves high quality food & drink, and a place for gambling, particularly cards & dice
3-4 L
Pie Shop: Meat or fruit pies; per pie
customers may bake their own bread for a small fee
1-5 sous
Restaurant meal
20 sous
Street Vendor: muffins, oranges, pies, roast pigeon, and eels
1-2 sous
Food
Price
Ale, Common: A pint of regular beer
6 deniers
Ale, Best: A pint of well-brewed beer
1 sous
Butter per pound
5-8 sous
Bread: A loaf of bread
1 sous
Cheese: A pound of cheese
6 sous
Chicken, uncooked:
30 deniers
Chicken, cooked: A whole chicken, ready roasted
6 sous
Eggs: A dozen hen’s eggs
6 sous
Goose: A fat goose, ready for roasting
1 L
Meal Out: A meal out, probably plain and uninspiring, purchased from a town or country inn
6-9 sous
Meat per pound
3 sous
Milk: assess milk per pint
3-4 sous
Pease Pudding: A slice of pease pudding
4-5 deniers
Pie: from a local pie shop; ranges from dangerous grease & mystery meat to savory meats and fruits
1-5 sous
Pig: whole pig uncooked

Whole Pig
24 L
Pizzle: jar of pickled porcine pizzle in a rich jelly
3 sous
Pottage: 1 serving of a bland stew of oats and vegetables with maybe some meat or gristle
9 deniers
Sugar: per pound
1 L
Tea per pound
50 L
Traveling Rations: strips of dried meat, with bread or hard biscuits per day
5 sous
Wine: average quality per pint                     (x1)
2-3 sous
Wine: good quality per pint                         (x2)
4-6 sous
Wine: fine quality per pint                           (x5)
10-15 sous
Wine: Bottle of average wine (1.5 pints)
6 sous
Wine: Bottle of good wine (1.5 pints)
12 sous
Wine: Bottle of fine wine (1.5 pints)
30 sous
Entertainment
Price
Prostitute: The services of a cheap, and not necessarily cheerful, prostitute
9 sous
Theatre, general admission
5 sous
Theatre, gallery seat
7 sous
Theatre, box seat
10 sous
Clothing
SR            Price
Impoverished Attire: peasant’s smock, wood sabots1
SR 1-            1 L
Common man’s wardrobe: shirt, rough breeches, plain doublet, rough wool stockings, shoes, cap2
SR 2+         12 L
Clothing
SR            Price
Common woman’s wardrobe: homespun dress, rough wool stockings, white apron, shoes, cap3
SR 2+         12 L
Respectable Attire (Female): warm cloak, simple, somber dress, plain collar & cuffs, white apron, plain bonnet or hat, plain gloves, sensible shoes4
SR 4+         28 L
Respectable Attire (Male): plain hat, somber colored coat & breeches, plain shirt & collar, sensible shoes5
SR 4+         30 L
Rugged Attire: wool hat, wool or soft leather jacket or jerkin, shirt, trousers, boots, warm socks6
SR 4+         35 L
Flamboyant Attire (Female): satin lined cloak, low-cut satin or velvet dress, full skirts, lacy petticoats, long gloves, delicate shoes; fan (indoors), mask (outdoors)7
SR 7+         90 L
Flamboyant Attire (Male): flamboyant suit, laced collar & cuffs, decorated stockings, wide boots, fancy hat8
SR 7+         70 L
Noblewoman’s attire: silk lined cloak, fine silk dress with lace collar & cuffs, silk gloves, silk stockings, matching adorned shoes, ornate fan and mask
SR 10+      185 L
Nobleman’s attire: noble suit 140, silk hose 25, tooled leather boots 25,15 buckskin gloves, 20elaborate hat10
SR 10+      225 L
3,4 Apron, plain white
30 sous
Apron, fancy embroidered
10 L
6 Boots, plain, suitable for work
4 L
8 Boots, wide aping the style of the wealthy
10 L
10 Boots, tooled leather with silver trim
25 L
5,6 Breeches, plain
5 L
8 Breeches, wide aping stylish fashion
10 L
10 Breeches, with adornment and silver trim
20 L
Cap, beaver: a rare New World import
100 L
2 Cap, woolen or linen
1 L
4 Cloak, warm ordinary
8 L
Cloak, Gentleman’s: fine wool, satin lined
30 L
Cloak, Noble: silk lined
50 L
5 Coat, plain, somber colored
14 L
Coat, long: Ordinary winter coat
16 L
Coat, lined warm winter coat with a fox fur lining
80 L
4,5 Collar band, plain: Plain collar band
8 sous
7,8 Collar band, lacy: A lacy collar
2 L
9,10 Collar band, elaborate lacy: A wide lace collar
5 L
2 Doublet, plain: A plain and functional jacket
5 L
8 Doublet, flashy: dyed or decorative
15 L
Doublet, fancy: soft leather buck skin, silver trim
60 L
10 Doublet, finely made, satin
100 L
3 Dress, homespun: plain dress
6.5 L
4 Dress, respectable: Unadorned and plain dress
10 L
7 Dress, flamboyant, velvet or satin
30 L
9 Dress, silk with fancy stitching and trim
30 L
7 Fan, lady’s: plain
2 L
10 Fan, lady’s: ornamented
10 L
Fan, lady’s court: bejeweled with semi-precious stones
100 L
4 Gloves, plain: Plain hand coverings
2 L
7 Gloves, long: Long, lacy gloves
4 L
10 Gloves, buckskin: made from soft buck-skin
15 L
9 Gloves, silk: Imported fine silk gloves
25 L
Handkerchief: Lacy handkerchief
6 sous
Handerchief (Mouchoir): scented or 'sweetbag'
1 L
5 Hat, plain: Simple town hat
3 L
6 Hat, warm: wool huntsman’s hat
5 L
8 Hat, fancy: decorated and plumed
10 L
10 Hat, elaborate: decorated, silver buckle and plumed
20 L
6 Jerkin, Leather: Similar to a doublet, but without the sleeves, this version is in a hard wearing leather
15 L
7 Mask, plain: Simple unadorned mask
5 L
10 Mask, plain: adorned mask
25 L
Mask, bejeweled: adorned with semi-precious stones
200 L
7 Petticoat: Cheap but frilly petticoat
8 L
Ruff: a wide, round lace collars, still a common sight
6 L
2 Shirt, country: loose weave
30 sous
5,6 Shirt: Basic shirt designed for everyday wear
50 sous
8 Shirt, frilly lace cuffs and collar: (cheap adornment)
10 L
10 Shirt, silk with lace cuffs and collar
20 L
1 Shoes, wooden sabots
5 sous
4,5 Shoes, plain: Basic shoes, hard-wearing and plain
30 sous
7 Shoes, delicate: Dainty shoes
3 L
9 Shoes, delicate: adorned and dainty shoes
15 L
1 Smock, peasants: cheap & attractive as a sack
15 sous
2,3 Stockings, rough wool, homemade
1 L
Clothing
Price
4,5 Stockings, plain
4 L
6 Stockings, worsted: Well knitted winter stockings
4 L
8 Stockings, decorated: (male)
15 L
7 Stockings, decorated: (female)
8 L
9,10 Stockings, silk: Imported fine silk stockings
25 L
8 Suit, flamboyant: frilly shirt, lace cuff & collar, doublet with cheap adornment and matching breeches
SR 7+         35 L
10 Noble Suit, expertly tailored: matching silk shirt, satin doublet and breeches, all with silver lace trims
SR 10+      140 L
Sweetbag: scented 'sweetbag'
1 L
Everyday Items
Price
Backpack: sturdy cloth or leather backpack
5 L
Bandages
1 L
Bedroll: A blanket and pad, usually tightly rolled
1 L
Bible: A well bound copy of the Bible (prices: RPG source = 6 shillings ~ 6 L; literary source 10 shillings)
6-10 L
Bottle: A glass bottle. Cost: 6d

Candle, Tallow (illuminates a 3’ radius for 6 hours)
1-2 sous
Candle, Wax (illuminates a 4’ radius for 6 hours)
1 L
Coal per cauldron
20 L
Cooking Kit: Portable(ish) cooking set, including kettle, pans, mortar, pestle and small spit. Cost: 20s
4 L
Crowbar
16 sous
Deck of cards: cheap playing cards
10 sous
Everyday Items
Price
Ordinary Book (150-200 pages)
2-3 L
Dice set and Playing Cards good quality
2 L
Flint and Tinder: Flint and tinder used to start fires
1 sous
Hammer: Basic construction tool.
1 L
Lantern:
2 L
Lantern, Bullseye:
4 L
Lantern, Dark:
3 L
Lantern Candle: burns for 6-8 hours

Lantern Oil: burns ½ oz. per hour; oil can freeze

Mining Pick: Basic tool used in mining
30 sous
Pamphlet: cheap printed news-sheet, full of Faction propaganda, news of war, or tales of crime/witchery
1-2 sous
Pipe, clay: A cheaply made clay tobacco pipe
1-2 sous
Pitchfork: Basic pronged agricultural tool
25 sous
Rope, hemp: 10 yards of strong rope
1 L
Rushlight Nipper or Stand

Rushlights (1500 rushes/pound weight; 6 pounds of grease will dip a pound of rushes; cost for all)
2 L 6 sous
Large Sack
1 L
Sack (Large): Cloth or leather sack
15 sous
Sack (Small): Cloth or leather sack
6 sous
Scythe: Tool used for harvesting
35 sous
Shovel: Basic tool used for digging
30 sous
Tent: A simple 2-person canvas wedge tent
16 L
Tobacco: An ounce of tobacco from the New World
15 sous
Torch, pitch: (illuminates 10’ radius for 1 hour)
5 sous
Waterskin: holds water for 3 days
1 L
Writing Kit: Quills, ink and paper set
Pen, Paper, and Ink
8 L
2 L
Specialist Equipment
Price
Assortment of Chemicals
24 L
Beak Mask: worn by Physicians who fear disease miasmas; +2 to resist inhaled disease miasmas, -4 penalty to vision and hearing. Cost 100s
20 L
Caltrops (1 dozen)
1 L
Climbing Kit: leather harness, several short lengths of rope, pitons & climbing tools; +2 to climbing
20 L
Clock: A large clock, suitable for telling the time and an extravagant home furnishing. Cost: 100s
20 L
Compass: A magnetic compass, housed in a wooden, ivory or brass fitting. A lodestone is used to magnetize the piece. Cost: 40s
8 L
Compass
125 L
Craft Tools: A satchel with tools for a trade e.g. butchery, carpentry, masonry, etc.
20-50 L
Fishing Kit: several hooks, lures, a long rod, twined horse hair lines, +2 bonus to Explorer/Fishing
8 L
Good Gamecock (for cockfighting)
24 L
Grappling Hook
4 L
Healer’s Kit Galenic: Contains urine sample jar, leeches and tools necessary for drawing up an astrological chart, as well as the usual bandages & surgical tools.
50 L
Healer’s Kit Herbal: dried & fresh herbs, jars of ointment & poultice, mortar & pestle, & the usual bandages and surgical tools
30 L
Specialist Equipment
Price
Healer’s Kit Paracelsan: numerous chemical compounds (particularly mercury, sulphur, & salts), mortar & pestle, flasks & alembics for purifying & extracting chemical substances, & the usual bandages and surgical tools
100 L
Jack: small bottle for alchemical potions made of earthenware or glass; size & cost are the same, but glass jacks are clear & more fragile; they can be used for making alchemical grenades
1 L
Jack Box: a sturdy wooden box with shoulder strap; padded compartments for 16 potion jacks
10 L
Makeup and assortment of Wigs
10 L
Maps (France, Europe, or New World)
8 L
Musical Instruments:
Cornetto
Recorder
Lute
Bagpipes
Violin or “Cremony” slang for a violin from Cremona Italy as made by the Amati or Stradivari

12 L
2 L
15 L
10 L
Navigation instruments
20-120 L
Portable Laboratory: a cart filled with alchemical gear: oven, laboratory equipment, benches, and a tent. A horse, ox, or mule to pull it is extra
300 L
Printing Press: can be dismantled and carried on a cart; prints books, pamphlets, religious tracts, etc.
150 L
Seal Ring
12-16 L
Skeleton Keys: set of a dozen keys (illegal)
50-60 L
Specialist Equipment
Price
Spectacles (nose spectacles)
1-4 L
Spyglass (called a 'longue-vue' in French) x8 power
30 L
Surgeon’s surgical kit
30 L
Tennis racket and set of balls
8-10 L
Watch, silver pocket watch and chain
24 L
Watch, gold pocket watch and chain
40 L
Watchmaker’s Tools
32 L
Fees and Fines
Price
Bastille: nice cell per day
20 sous
Physician’s “guaranteed cure”
1,000-2,000 L
Gentry woman’s dowry
4,000–180,000 L
Year’s travel in Italy
20,000 L

Special Weapons and Armor

Solingen Steel: Produced in the town of Solingen in the Imperial Duchy of Berg, blades made from Solingen steel are among the finest found in Europe, praised for their strength, flexibility, and keen edge. Dueling weapons made from Solingen steel are one step above normal on the weapon strength table (i.e. a Solingen Steel Rapier counts as if it were a Sabre or Longsword for Strength). These weapons cost three times the normal price listed. Availability may be limited.
Toledo Steel: Blades made from Toledo steel are among the finest found in Europe, praised for their strength, flexibility, and keen edge. Dueling weapons made from Toledo steel are one step above normal on the weapon strength table (i.e. a Toledo Steel Rapier counts as if it were a Broadsword to resist breaking). These weapons cost three times the normal price listed. Availability may be limited.
Ornate Weapons: Whether for show or crafted for the nobility are decorated with semiprecious or precious stones, ivory, engraving, and silver or gold filigree work. The price of the weapon is increased by 100-200L for semiprecious stones and sliver trim and by 500+ L for precious stones and gold trim.
Masterwork Armor or Weapons: Masterwork weapons and armor reroll any result of a “1” when rolling Damage or Protection..

Horse Types

Type of Horse
Base Price
Lifeblood
Trot Speed
Gallop Speed
Donkey
30 £



Mule
50 £



Pony
60 £



Cob
75 £



Draft
100 £
14+2d6
35’
70’
Riding
160 £
10+2d6
40’
80’
Cavalry
200 £
12+2d6
40’
80’

Horse Quality

Quality
Price
Hit Points
Trot
Gallop
Poor
½
– 1D6
– 5’
– 10’
Fair
x1
Good
x2
+ 1D6–2
+ 2’
+ 5’
Excellent
x3
+ 1D6–1
+ 5’
+ 10’
Superb
x5
+ 1D6
+ 10’
+ 20’

Horse Combat

A horse’s hit points and speed vary by type and quality. If a horse is shot, or otherwise injured, it gives the rider/coachman a Penalty Die on any rolls. A horse that is at less than half its Lifeblood will simply stop and collapse unless the rider makes a Tough (-4) Career + Flair riding roll.
Riding horses are most often used for transportation by members of the nobility and the affluent bourgeoisie; a riding horse may be pressed into service as a draft animal in order to pull a cart of a carriage, but riding horses used in this way may only trot, not run. Riding horses may not wear barding.
Cavalry horses are trained to withstand the rigors of the battlefield; they may wear barding and do not shy or startle at loud noises or strong odors. Cavalry horses are never purchased at less than Fair quality. Cavalry horses ridden by cuirassiers and gendarmes wear barding which reduces damage from attacks by two; horses ridden by carabineers wear barding which reduces damage by one. Dragoons are mounted on riding horses, not cavalry horses. If the Royal Army is on campaign, cavalry horses will be scarce.
Draft horses pull plows, carts, wagons, and carriages; they are slower but stronger than riding horses. Should a character wish to purchase them, Excellent quality draft horses are scarce and Superb draft horses are extremely rare.

Horse Breed


Quality
Type
Homeland

Breed
P
F
G
E
S
R
C
D


Andalusian





X
X

Spain

Arabian





X
X

Arabia

Barbs*





X
*

North Africa

Boulonnais







X
Picardy, Artois, Flanders

Brabant







X
Flanders

Breton







X
Brittany/Bretagne

Camargue





X


Languedoc, Provence

Comtois






X
X
Burgundy, Franche Comte, Switzerland

Friesian





X
X
X
Netherlands

Holsteiner






X
X
Schleswig-Holstein Germany

Landais





X


Gascony

Merens





X


Bearn and Poix

Mecklenburger





X
X

Mecklenburg Germany

Noriker







X
Austria

Percheron






X
X
Normandy











* 10% of Superb can be cavalry trained)

Typical Horse Colors

Chestnut: Body is reddish brown, mane and tail are the same color or lighter (ie. blondish)
Bay: Body is reddish brown, mane and tail are black
Black: Horse is jet black
White: Horse is white
Brown: Anything darker than a bay but not jet black
Palomino: Body golden, mane and tail are white
Buckskin: Body is golden, mane tail and legs are black
Strawberry Roan: Body is reddish brown with white mixed evenly throughout, light mane and tail
Red Roan: Body is reddish brown with white mixed evenly throughout, dark mane and tail
Blue Roan: Body is darker brown with white mixed evenly throughout, dark mane and tail
Grey: Grey body with dark mane and tail

Typical Facial Markings

Star: Any white, vaguely circular/oblong marking on the forehead
Stripe: A narrow white stripe running from forehead to the nostrils
Snip: A white stripe between the nostrils
Blaze: A wide white stripe from forehead to nostril
Bald/White Faced: The entire forehead is white, including around the eyes

Typical Leg Markings

Coronet: A very narrow band just above the hoof
Pastern: A band from hoof to the pastern bone (first joint above the hoof)
Sock: A band from the hoof that extends above the pastern, but below the hock (second leg joint)
Stocking: A band from hoof to hock
Note that markings are usually white. This program will generate white horses with markings; you should ignore the markings information in this case.

Creature Size Table*

Size
Damage
Lifeblood
Move
Creature
Tiny
1
1
15’
Rat
Very Small
1d2
2
20’
Cat
Small
1d3
5
25’
Dog
Medium
1d6-1
5+1d6-1
25’
Wolf
Large
1d6
10+1d6
30’
Gorilla
Very Large
1d6+1
10+2d6
30’
Riding Horse
Very Large
1d6+2
12+2d6
30’
Cavalry Horse
Very Large
1d6+2
14+2d6
30’
Draft Horse
Huge
2d6-1
30
35’
Rhino
Massive
2d6
40
35’
Elephant
Enormous
2d6+2
50
40’
Tooth Whale
Gigantic
3d6
60
40’
Sea Serpent
Immense
3d6+2
75
45’
Baleen Whale
Colossal
4d6
100
45’
Kraken
* This replaces the table on page 92 of the rules.

Weapons

Note: Prices are for basic weapons and armor. Fittings are of iron or brass. Gilding, inlay, carving, etc. increase the price.
Musket: a long weapon requiring a fork rest to use and a match to fire.
Arquebus: shorter than a musket it does not require a fork rest to use.
Musketoon: (or Carbine) even shorter, it could be carried by cavalry.
Blunderbuss: an early version shot gun it can fire shot or pistol balls.
Matchlock uses a burning slow match in a clamp at the end of a small curved lever known as the serpentine. Upon the pulling of a lever protruding from the bottom of the gun and connected to the serpentine, the smoldering match is lowered into the flash pan igniting the priming powder. The flash from the primer travelled through the touch hole igniting the main charge of propellant in the gun barrel. The serpentine dipped backward, toward the firer, in the reverse of the familiar forward-dipping hammer of the flintlock and later firearms. Half or less of the price of a wheellock.
Snaplock ignites the powder by means of sparks produced when a spring-powered cock strikes a flint down on to a piece of hardened steel causing a shower of white hot steel shavings to fall towards the priming powder in the flash pan. The flash from the primer travels through the touch hole into the firing chamber igniting the gunpowder. The pan has a closed cover which must be manually opened. More expensive than a matchlock and more prone to misfire than a wheellock.
Snaphaunce operates like a snaplock but with the automatic pan opening of a wheellock. It was popular with thieves and highwaymen. Priced in between a matchlock and a wheellock.
Doglock contains flint, frizzen, and pan; it had an external catch as a half-cock safety, known as the "dog". To load a dog lock, the cock was first secured with the external dog, preventing it from moving forward to strike the frizzen. The user could then safely load the musket or pistol. To fire, the cock was moved to the full-cock position, which caused the dog to fall backward and no longer prevent the lock from firing.
Flintlock has all the advantages of the snaphaunce but with a simpler and more reliable mechanism. It is cheaper than a wheellock and requires less specialized metallurgical and mechanical knowledge to manufacture; it is a little cheaper and more reliable than a snaphaunce.
Wheellock spins a spring-loaded steel wheel (wound with a spanner)  against a piece of pyrite to generate intense sparks which ignite gunpowder in a pan, which flashes through the touchhole to ignite the main charge. The pyrite is clamped in vise jaws on a spring-loaded arm (or 'dog') which rests on the pan cover which automatically opens when the trigger is pulled. At least twice the price of a matchlock.

Ammunition

Black Powder comes in three grades: fine priming powder, coarser charging powder, and very coarse cannon powder. It sells for 5 sous per pound regardless of type.
Standard powder kegs weigh about 100lbs, with a volume of 1.25 cubic feet. There is sufficient powder in one keg for about 4,000 musket loads or about 6,000 to 8,000 pistol loads. A typical musket load is 150 to 200 grains.
There are 40 shots to a pound for a musket, musketoon, rifle or blunderbuss. 80 shots to a pound for a pocket pistol, 65 for a belt pistol, 75 for a horse pistol..
Shot: most people cast their own and a firearm comes with a mold to make bullets for the weapon (one at a time). A musket typically gets between 10 and 20 shots per pound of lead and a pistol from 15 to 25 shots/lb; (a cubic foot of pure lead weighs 712.5lbs.)

Specialty Items for Blackpowder Guns

Whisk: to clean fouling from touch hole.
Pick Tool: to clean fouling from touch hole.
Spring Vise: keeps a lock's springs from being unseated and lost.
12 Apostles: wooden bottles on a wide leather belt, each bottle holds 1 charge. 2 L.
Powder Flask.

Melting Pot: pot, tongs, and ladle; 6 bullets per melt.

Igniters

Match: 2 varieties, quick and slow. Quick Match is used as a fuse. Its speed can vary from 1 foot per minute to 4 yards per minute. Slow Match is used to keep fire handy. It burns at about 4 inches per hour. Both varieties weigh 1lb per 5 yards. A pound of match costs 15 sous.
Flints: A flint is good for around 12 to 15 shots. A keg of flints weighs 70lbs and holds about 10,000 flints.
Pyrites: (used in Wheellocks) are a little heavier and less durable. One is good for about 8 to 12 shots. A 100lb keg holds about 50,000 firings.
Wadding: Wadding is usually cloth, paper, or leather; it is placed over the charge to provide a seal, and over the shot to keep it in place. Old sail cloth is often used for wadding.
Cartridge Paper: When paper cartridges are used, a bundle weighs about 40lbs and occupies a cubic foot, it is sufficient for 16,000 cartridges.
Cartridge Box: leather case attaches to belt, 1lb empty wooden block inside holds premade cartridges, more stored underneath. Capacity= 20 in most; (10 sous).
Tool Kit: Jag, worm, screw driver, vent pick, scower, grease cartridge former, and rammer (8 sous).
Single Bullet Mold casts a single bullet (8 sous).
Note: A gun includes mold and tool kit; the price is for a replacement.
Spanner used to wind a wheellock (2L); Wheellocks come with a spanner which is uniquely made for the gun.

Fashion and Attire

Flamboyant Attire, Female: A low-cut dress (probably of satin or velvet, the more expensive outfits in silk) with full skirts, hitched up slightly to reveal lacy petticoats, long gloves and delicate shoes. The wearer would keep her hair tied behind, allowing her ringlets to fall forward, and courtly women (or those pretending to be courtly) wear masks when out in public. Cost: 50s
Flamboyant Attire, Male: Loose fitting coat, a doublet and frilly shirt with large laced collars and cuffs, full breeches, decorated stockings, and full wide boots. Everything is adorned with trimmings and braiding. The wearer likely wears his hair long and curled into ringlets, and possibly wears make-up and ear-rings. Cost: 50s
Impoverished Attire: Anything from a collection of rags to the plainest peasant smock. If anything is worn on the feet, it is probably a pair of dilapidated hand-me-downs or homemade shoes of wood and dirty rags. This attire marks out the wearer as poverty-stricken. Cost: 0-10d
Respectable Attire, Female: An unadorned dress, cut simply and of sombre hue, a plain collar and cuffs, a large white apron, a plain head-covering and/or hat, and sensible shoes. Cost: 30s
Respectable Attire, Male: A plain hat, a coat and breeches in sombre colours, a shirt with a plain collar and cuffs, and sensible shoes. Cost: 30s
Rugged Attire: A hard-wearing jacket (possibly of soft leather) and jerkin, shirt, trousers, boots and warm socks. This outfit is usually chosen through necessity, rather than as a fashion statement. Cost: 30s
Equipment for a German Landsknechts ca 16th Century (cost in gulden): long pike (1G), helmet (3G), arquebus (3.5G), simple armor (12G). They paid for their own food, clothing, and shoes out of their monthly wage of (4G) from Furies by Lauro Martines, pp. 50-51.
War horses in Italy in the late 15th C. sold for not less than 30 gold ducats and the best went for 80 or 90 ducats equal to nearly two years wages for a master craftsman in the Venetian shipyards. Ibid, p158
A fine cavalry horse in the Netherlands in 1646 was worth more than twice the value “of a black galley slave and twelve times that of an Irish infantryman” which tells something of the wages of Irish soldiers. Ibid, p. 158 quoting R.A. Stradling.
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